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香蕉视频丝瓜Dentist in Elk Grove, CA

Friday, February 3, 2017

Exercise Can Improve Dental Health & Your Dentist’s Skills

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Everyone knows that physical activity has innumerable benefits, such as improving your muscle mass, reducing your risk of heart disease, strengthening your bone density, etc. But when people think of physical exercise improving their bodies, they aren't typically thinking of it improving their oral health.

However, one article that was published last spring says that exercise can reduce gum disease and reduce the link to other secondary illnesses that affect the oral cavity:

Positive Impact of Exercise on dental health

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A study published in the Journal of Dentistry in 2005 found that regular exercise can help lower the risk of contracting periodontitis, or gum disease. After studying the relationship between gum disease and physical activity, the report concluded that exercising regularly is associated with lower risk of developing gum disease. In fact, the people who regularly worked out and had never smoked were 54% less likely to have periodontitis compared to those who reported no regular physical activity. A National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey also found that even partially active people (exercising 3 times or less per week) were 33% less likely to have periodontitis than those who do not exercise.

Correlation between BMI and Oral Health
Maintaining a healthy BMI (body mass index) is actually very beneficial for your oral health. Health issues associated with obesity like hypertension and diabetes are known for contributing to poor oral health. In fact, a study in The Journal of Periodontology from the University of Florida conducted a study to find the affect that weight has on dental health. Researchers looked at BMI, body fat percentage, and oxygen consumption to assess how healthy each participant was. According to the study “Individuals who maintained normal weight, engaged in the recommended level of exercise, and had a high-quality diet were 40% less likely to have periodontitis compared to individuals who maintained none of these health-enhancing behaviors.”

Since the aim of dentistry is to focus on preventative methods before resorting to restorative options, it's in your best interest to add exercise to other good habits like daily brushing and flossing. For other preventative treatments that can help, check out lagunavistadental.com/services/preventive-dentistry/.

Not only is exercise beneficial to patients' oral health, but it is beneficial to dentists and their practices. Dental student Jeffrey Asano says that dentists should make exercise a priority since it can help you relieve the stresses of the profession while in school and at your future practice. Furthermore, he says that some of his exercises have actually improved his skill set:

Outdoor Hobbies Might Just Improve Your Dentistry

For me, backpacking is a great avenue to escape the stresses of dental school. It offers a moment of peace to reflect in nature, which can significantly improve your mental health as well as provide a means for physical exercise. Since nearly everyone can walk, backpacking is an accessible activity for many people. Hiking trails for beginners are as short as one mile and those seeking a challenge can tackle trails as long as 20 miles. No matter the length of the trail, backpackers from all physical fitness levels are welcome to move at their own pace. The best part of backpacking is that it offers so many ways to feel accomplished. For some, enjoying the journey is more satisfying than reaching the destination.  However, my favorite aspect is finding hidden gems along the trail, such as a waterfall or a famous bouldering location.

While backpacking hiking trails is my way of relaxing, bouldering is my way to improve strength.  Bouldering is a great alternative to those who find going to the gym too repetitive. Plus, building your grip strength through climbing has benefits that can be applied to practicing dentistry. Improving finger strength can help steady your hands for deep cleanings, applying rubber dams, holding a handpiece or even torquing implants. For those who enjoy the social aspect of hobbies, bouldering has a close-knit community that encourages camaraderie and mutual support for other climbers . . .

Although these kinds of exercise benefits may seem minute in comparison to others, they can really add up in the long run. Dental practitioners will be better equipped to deal with the stresses and physical activity required at work, and patients will have better chances of only needing preventative services.

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The blog post Exercise Can Improve Dental Health & Your Dentist’s Skills is republished from: Laguna Vista Dental - Dentist Office



Laguna Vista Dental
7915 Laguna Blvd, Ste 150
Elk Grove, CA 95758
(916) 684-3105
lagunavistadental@gmail.com

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Thursday, February 2, 2017

Dealing with Chipped Teeth is More Difficult Than You Might Think

Trying to figure out a dental emergency can be a bit tricky--if you're in pain, then you obviously would want to get in ASAP, right? However, the best course of action is to call your dentist first so they can figure out just how bad the situation is. For instance, if your pain can be soothed with oral analgesics, then you most likely can wait. Teeth, crowns, inlays, onlays, and other restorations that have been knocked out often warrant a visit.

But what about a chipped a tooth? Is the problem just cosmetic or is there functional damage as well? While you may think that figuring out the severity of a chipped tooth is difficult, believe it or not, it can be difficult for practitioners as well!

The Daily Grind reiterates how important it is to call dentists first to assess the situation, since the term "chipped tooth" can cover a wide range of issues:

Deciphering the Meaning of ‘I Chipped a Tooth’

I know this is something you hear all the time: “I chipped a tooth.” This can mean so many things, especially if it is coming from a nondentist.

 

“I chipped a tooth” in the posterior can be a chip off the marginal ridge next to a class II restoration that you did five years ago. And if you saw this, you might just say, “It is fine,” or you might just smooth it off. Or a broken tooth in the posterior could mean the ling cusp of tooth No. 12 just broke to the gumline and below.

The question that usually comes up at our office is: How do we schedule patients who call and say, “I chipped a tooth.”

 

I am a doctor who does not like to schedule a “come in and we will see” visit. I know how difficult it can be for people to take time off of work or get a babysitter just so I can tell them, “Yep, you have a chipped tooth, and we can see you in three weeks to take care of this.”

 

Sometimes I schedule 50 minutes for a chip on the anterior that you couldn’t see with a microscope, or I might schedule 20 minutes for a “chip” when, actually, a child fell off his bike and “chipped” the heck out of teeth Nos. 8 and 9, to the point where the nerves were hanging out.

 

Because I refuse to do a “look-and-see” appointment, about a year ago, we bought a smartphone for the office. First, we bought it to be able to send text messages to people to confirm their appointments. We all know that calling someone at home and leaving a message on their voicemail is about as effective as sending a smoke signal (but we tried for 10 years). And nearly everyone has a smartphone these days, and everyone sends text messages (except for Grandma Nel, who we still just call). Now that we have this designated smartphone, we just ask people to send us a photo of the tooth via text message.

Hopefully more and more dentists implement this smartphone picture idea. Although a poorly lit picture off your phone isn't the most ideal diagnosis tool, it is a start and can weed out non-emergencies.

When you do get to see your dentist for a chipped tooth, you may want to ask him or her about visiting a radiologist. According to one Chinese study, it may be beneficial to visit a radiologist as well as your dentist, since their imaging equipment may be more thorough when checking for potential chips and cracks that aren't immediately apparent:

Which imaging system is better for diagnosing tooth cracks?

When it comes to examining images of a tooth and identifying a crack, should you use periapical radiography or cone-beam CT (CBCT)? Also, who is better trained to identify these cracks on images, an endodontist or a radiologist?

Researchers from China noted that cracks in teeth present practitioners with a challenge in designing a treatment plan. Using both periapical radiography (PR) and CBCT, they investigated the best imaging method to identify these cracks while also comparing the performance of different practitioners (PLOS One, January 4, 2017).

 

"In clinical practice, it is a huge challenge for endodontists to know the depth of a crack in a cracked tooth," the authors wrote . . .Early enamel cracks have no obvious symptoms and may not be visible on examination. Yet they can lead to patients coming to your office because of pulpitis, periapical periodontitis, or even root fracture. As creating an appropriate treatment plan and assessing the long-term prognosis for these teeth can be difficult, there's a need to understand the best way to diagnose this condition . . .

 

"Within the limitations of this study, on an artificial simulation model of cracked teeth for early diagnosis, we recommend that it would be better for a cracked tooth to be diagnosed by a radiologist with CBCT than PR," the authors concluded.

If you aren't sure what constitutes an emergency or how to take care of a chipped tooth, you can find more information at lagunavistadental.com/services/general-dentistry/emergency-dentist/.

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Dealing with Chipped Teeth is More Difficult Than You Might Think was first published on: Laguna Vista Dental Dentistry Blog



Laguna Vista Dental
7915 Laguna Blvd, Ste 150
Elk Grove, CA 95758
(916) 684-3105
lagunavistadental@gmail.com

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Thursday, January 26, 2017

Helping Children Early On Means They May Not Need Sedation Dentistry in the Future

The fear of heights, public speaking, and spiders are all pretty common. And how about the fear of the dentist? Colgate.com says that as much as 15% of U.S. patients suffer from this type of anxiety--to put that in perspective, that's well over 20 million people!

Thankfully dentists do understand this problem and that's why sedation dentistry has really helped many people. A recent blog post goes over what sedation is and how it can help?

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With sedation, the dentist administers a drug before or during the dental procedure. Only one type — general anesthesia — renders the patient completely unconscious. The other forms will relax you, but won’t knock you out completely.

 

The most common types of sedation dentistry include the following:

  • Nitrous oxide: A gas that relaxes you during the procedure. It wears off quickly, so your dentist might let you drive yourself home after the appointment.
  • Oral sedatives: Oral sedatives, such as diazepam, also help relax patients during dental procedures. You typically take them an hour or so before your appointment. You’re fully awake but less anxious, and you might feel a little sleepy until it wears off.
  • Intravenous sedatives: Intravenous, or IV, sedatives can put you in varying stages of consciousness. This is also known as general anesthesia and, as mentioned above, will put you into a deep sleep until it wears off. Other IV drugs, however, can put you into a “twilight sleep.” You’re less aware of your surroundings, you might feel sleepy, and you might not remember much of the procedure once it’s over.

Some patients assume that general anesthesia offers the best solution. However, it also comes with more potential side effects than the other methods, so you might want to consider a lesser form of sedation dentistry. If your dental care provider mentions sleep dentistry, he or she likely means general anesthesia.
You might prefer dental sedation or sleep dentistry, but talk to your dentist about it first. Mention any allergic reactions you’ve experienced in the past, especially to anesthesia, so your dental professional can make safe, educated recommendations.

Read more at 123dentist.com . . .

Sedation dentistry is very safe for children, but as 123dentist.com says--like with any procedure--there are potential side effects. You understandably may not want to consider this option for your child, so what can you do?

First off, if you have a fear of the dentist yourself, it's best not to talk about it in front of your son or daughter so they don't pick up the fear themselves. You can also decrease their anxiety by reading children's books about dentists. Instead of just telling them to not be afraid, these books will have illustrations and a story showing how positive this experience can be. Also, you may want to go in with your son or daughter during the appointment and sit by them if they are very afraid.

Drbicuspid.com editor Lori Roniger posted a study that showed that dentists who said reassuring phrases also were able to improve dental anxiety and seem more empathetic to caregivers:

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Practitioners who provide more positive reinforcement and reassurance when speaking with pediatric patients were perceived by caregivers to be more patient-centered and empathetic, according to a new study conducted in Hong Kong.

 

In addition, the inclusion of caregivers in conversation, such as the clinician mentioning the parent or caregiver present, was a key factor in producing a quality clinical experience, the study authors reported in PLOS One (January 3, 2017).

 

"Unlike the conversations focusing on the treatment procedures, those offering positive reinforcement and reassurance appeared to the caregivers that the clinicians were providing more patient-centered care and showing more concern to the patients, thereby creating more clinician-patient interaction," wrote Hai Ming Wong, PhD, DDS, and colleagues at the University of Hong Kong. "Engaging patient-centered care can help clinicians build stronger clinician-patient relationships for productive engagement in preventive care."

 

Dr. Wong is a clinical associate professor of pediatric dentistry at the university. Researchers from disciplines such as dental public health, psychology, and education at the university participated in the study.

Saying 'mommy' is helpful

The authors noted that good communication has been found to result in improved patient cooperation, self-care skills, and treatment plan adherence, as well as better treatment outcomes and a lower likelihood of dental anxiety. However, good communication may not be sufficient to achieve these results, with other active ingredients likely embedded within good communication underpinning those effects, they explained.

Read full article here . . .

If you want to learn more about pediatric dentistry and how to help your child get over their fears, take a look at lagunavistadental.com/services/general-dentistry/pediatric/

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Helping Children Early On Means They May Not Need Sedation Dentistry in the Future was first published on: Laguna Vista Dental Dentistry Blog



Laguna Vista Dental
7915 Laguna Blvd, Ste 150
Elk Grove, CA 95758
(916) 684-3105
lagunavistadental@gmail.com

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Wednesday, January 25, 2017

Students Interested in Pursuing a Dentistry Job Should Look at Dental Therapy

Dentists take No. 1 spot in 2017 best jobs list

For the third year in a row, dental professionals topped the U.S. News & World Report’s annual list ranking the best jobs of the year, according to ADA News.

 

Dentists, which ranked No. 2 in 2016’s list, took the No. 1 spot in 2017. It last held the top spot in 2015. Orthodontists, which ranked No. 1 last year, is this year’s fifth best occupation; oral and maxillofacial surgeons rounded up the top 10 with a tie for No. 9.

 

Occupations are ranked based on U.S. News’ calculated overall score, which combines several components into a single weighted average score between zero and 10. These components are: 10-year growth volume; 10-year growth percentage; median salary; job prospects; employment rate; stress level; and work-life balance.

 

Dentists scored an overall score of 8.2; orthodontists, 8.1; and oral and maxillofacial surgeon, 7.7.

 

“The Bureau of Labor Statistics predicts employment growth of 18 percent between 2014 and 2024, with 23,300 new openings,” according to the U.S. News & World Report. “A comfortable salary, low unemployment rate and agreeable work-life balance boost dentist to a top position on our list of best jobs.”

 

The magazine also reports that orthodontists and oral and maxillofacial surgeons are expected to grow by 18 percent from 2014 to 2024, with about 1,500 new job openings for orthodontists and 1,200 new jobs for oral and maxillofacial surgeons.

Not only are thousands of job opportunities opening up, but denticle.com says that of all the health professionals Americans want to see more of, dentists--once again--come out on top.

On the flip-side, dental school is very competitive, and along with finishing your bachelor's degree, you'll need to pass the Dental Admissions Test (DAT) and complete four or more years of schooling before you can start practicing.

Could you go to school for something else? You may want to look into dental therapy according to drbicuspid.com:

Survey: 80% of U.S. voters support dental therapists

>Americans overwhelmingly support the concept of dental therapists, according to the results of a recent phone survey. Interviewers asked thousands of registered U.S. voters if they would like a new type of midlevel provider similar to a nurse practitioner, and 80% of respondents said yes . . .

 

Critics are concerned that dental therapists will not provide the same standard of care as a dentist. They also tend to be skeptical that therapists can increase access to dental care or reduce costs.

 

Meanwhile, proponents of midlevel providers point to evidence that dental therapists effectively reduce untreated caries, not only in the few U.S. states that have approved their use but also abroad. In addition, support for midlevel providers appears to be gaining momentum.

Although there is some natural skepticism about the roles of dental therapists, these professionals are trained to clean teeth, apply sealants, and administer anesthetic. Many of these therapists perform pediatric dental treatments under the supervision of a dentist, while others have a dual license as a hygienist/therapist.

This career option is flexible, less competitive, and helpful in areas where low-income children need affordable dental care. If you aren't sure which career path you should take, you'll want to learn more about the education requirements different dental specialties, like pediatric dentistry. You can learn more at lagunavistadental.com/services/general-dentistry/pediatric/

 

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Students Interested in Pursuing a Dentistry Job Should Look at Dental Therapy was first published on: Laguna Vista Dental



Laguna Vista Dental
7915 Laguna Blvd, Ste 150
Elk Grove, CA 95758
(916) 684-3105
lagunavistadental@gmail.com

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Friday, January 20, 2017

Mouthwash: The Good & The Bad

Discover Magazine released an intriguing article a few years back about the great benefits of mouth wash. According to researchers, Streptococcus mutans is the bacterial culprit when it comes to our cavities. But during a small clinical study, they found that mouthwash was able to pretty much wipe this bacteria away so that healthy bacteria could take its place and thrive. This study was very small, so 0f course, further research will be needed before we know exactly how long these kinds of results last.

But mouthwash's benefits don't seem to stop there. According to a recent article at drbicuspid.com, there have actually been studies testing the effect of mouthwash on sexually-transmitted infections:

Can Listerine prevent STIs? Researchers want to find out

Rinsing with the antiseptic mouthwash Listerine for one minute can significantly reduce the prevalence of gonorrhea-causing bacteria, according to a new study. Now, researchers want to know whether Listerine can also help prevent the spread of sexually transmitted infections (STIs).

 

"If Listerine has an inhibitory effect against N. gonorrhoeae in the pharynx, it could be a cheap, easy to use, and potentially effective intervention for gonorrhea prevention and control," wrote the authors, led by Eric Chow, MPH, PhD. Chow is a senior research fellow at the Melbourne Sexual Health Clinic . . .

 

In addition to their clinical trial, the researchers performed an in vitro study in which they tested the effect of Cool Mint Listerine and Total Care Listerine on N. gonorrhoeaecolonies. They also found that both types of Listerine significantly slowed bacterial growth after just one minute.

 

"The two studies presented here are the first to demonstrate Listerine can inhibit the growth of N. gonorrhoeae in vitro and in a clinical study and raise the potential that it may be useful as a control measure," Chow and colleagues wrote.

While people may use mouthwash for small things--like bad breath or whitening--it's pretty cool that an inexpensive over-the-counter product has the possibility of reducing cavity- and STI-causing bacteria.

Despite these benefits, you may be surprised to hear that there are detractors. In fact, one of these opponents is actually a dentist (Dr. Alvin Danenberg):

Yes, I tell them antibacterial mouthwash kills bacteria. Yes, bacteria can cause gum disease. Yes, you should want healthy gums.

 

But you know that bacteria serve many purposes in the mouth, when the good bacteria balance out the bad kinds. Healthy gums are dependent on a healthy balance of bacteria. One underrated bacterial benefit is to allow a specific pathway of digestion to occur that is critical for health.

Mouth bacteria

When bacteria are killed indiscriminately, both harmful and good bacteria are killed, and the mouth's delicate balance of bacteria goes awry. This means that tooth decay and gum disease may be more likely to occur.

 

To address their concerns, I talk with my patients about the benefits of mouth bacteria and the unique role they play in the chemical pathway of certain foods. Specifically, the chemical pathway of "nitrate-to-nitrite-to-nitric oxide" is dependent on specific anaerobic bacteria in the mouth . . .

 

So I tell my patients, if you kill the bacteria in your mouth and on your tongue with antiseptic mouthwash, salivary nitrates wouldn't be converted into nitrites. With less nitrites in your system, you would produce less beneficial nitric oxide.

While mouthwash does have benefits, Dr. Danenberg does make some sound points. After all, whenever you take an antibiotic, your doctor will usually tell you to take a probiotic so your gut flora isn't unbalanced. If mouthwash is able to kill good bacteria, what's stopping bad bacteria from thriving again?

If you aren't sure how often you should use mouthwash, it's just best to ask your dentist at your next dental cleaning. He or she may say it's okay, or you may be offered alternatives. Take a look at lagunavistadental.com/services/preventive-dentistry/

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The following article Mouthwash: The Good & The Bad is available on: Laguna Vista Dental - Dentist Office



Laguna Vista Dental
7915 Laguna Blvd, Ste 150
Elk Grove, CA 95758
(916) 684-3105
lagunavistadental@gmail.com

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Thursday, January 19, 2017

Many Seniors Will Experience GERD — How a Dentist Can Help

Sixty percent of the adult population in the U.S. will have gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) symptoms that could last a year (some adults will experience GERD on a weekly basis). What does GERD do exactly? You probably are already familiar with the common symptoms of heartburn and nausea, but GERD can also cause excess stomach acids to rise back up in the esophagus and mouth, which can cause tooth decay.

While just about anyone can experience GERD, seniors are at a higher risk--especially seniors over the age of 65 who are taking medications with side effects that affect the GI tract. And since 123dentist.com says that seniors are already at risk for worn-down enamel, it's vital that they get a handle on any GERD symptoms:

Oral issues you need to be aware of as you get older

Wearing down enamel

All the chewing, grinding, and hard impact that your teeth are put through over the years can take a real toll on their health. Not to mention any breakages, chips, or other trauma your teeth may have been exposed to which may result in even worse consequences down the line. Over time your teeth are gradually worn down from continued use or from damage, and this erosion diminishes the hard protective outer layer of teeth – the enamel – which cannot be naturally regained once it’s lost.

 

To combat enamel loss, be aware of habits that may be speeding up damage done to your teeth and try to stop them as soon as possible. These habits included chewing ice or other hard things like pens and pencils, grinding your teeth, clenching your jaw, and playing high impact sports without an athletic mouthguard. If you are prone to unconscious teeth grinding or clenching, ask your dentist about being fitted for a mouthguard you can wear while sleeping to protect your teeth. Frequent consumption of highly acidic foods such as fruit juices, citrus fruits, coffee, and soft drinks is also a culprit for enamel erosion as the acids eat away at the protective layer. Try to substitute water for acidic beverages and brush your teeth 30 minutes or so after consuming acidic foods to stop the acids from attacking your teeth before they can start. Since the acids weaken enamel, waiting before brushing is important to avoid causing extra harm.

If a senior is having difficulty with GERD, then he or she should take the previous tips to heart. After all, if someone already has erosion from stomach acids, adding acidic beverages and foods isn't a great idea.

While some people may be lax about their oral health care, it can be a great boon to those GERD. For instance, fluoride treatments can strengthen enamel and prevent it from softening from stomach acids. You can learn more about these kinds of treatments at lagunavistadental.com/services/preventive-dentistry/fluoride-treatments/

Besides fluoride treatment, dental expert John Flucke says that oral discs can greatly help:

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Gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD), more commonly known as acid reflux, describes a chronic digestive condition in which an accumulation of stomach acid in the esophagus creates symptoms. Acid reflux affects about 30 percent of the population on a weekly basis and is known to contribute to or cause a number of medical and dental problems including heartburn, sore throat, laryngitis, cough, halitosis, and tooth decay. The condition is also associated with sleep disturbance and can have a negative effect on nighttime comfort and overall quality of life.

 

The study aimed to prove if XyliMelts, recently rated by a Clinicians Report® survey as the most effective remedy for alleviating dry mouth? could produce similar results in treating patients suffering from acid reflux, which is often managed by prescribed and over-the-counter medications that prevent excessive acid production . . .

 

XyliMelts are formulated from all-natural ingredients commonly used in foods. As tests prove that salivary stimulants can decrease the perception of nighttime dry mouth, tests also suggest increased saliva can diminish nighttime reflux . . . Test results displayed that both the disc and gel reduced the taste of reflux, heartburn sensation, morning hoarseness, perceived reflux severity, and the number of antacids taken during the night.

Read full blog post here . . .

And since these XyliMelts are made from all-natural ingredients used in food, that makes it more likely that they won't have any reactions with medications that seniors may be taking already. You can talk with your dentist for more information about these kinds of remedies.

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Many Seniors Will Experience GERD — How a Dentist Can Help was first published on: Laguna Vista Dental - Dentist Office



Laguna Vista Dental
7915 Laguna Blvd, Ste 150
Elk Grove, CA 95758
(916) 684-3105
lagunavistadental@gmail.com

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Friday, January 13, 2017

Why is Preventive Dental Care So Important for Seniors?

One of the wonderful perks of getting older is increased risk for many health issues. For instance, as you age, certain kinds of cancer are more common--especially oral cancer:

Oral Cancer: What You Need to Know

Oral cancer is the sixth most common cancer, accounting for 30,000 newly diagnosed cases each year – and 8,000 deaths. If not diagnosed and treated in its early stages, oral cancer can spread, leading to chronic pain, loss of function, facial and oral disfigurement and even death.

Who gets oral cancer?

Anyone can get oral cancer. Heavy drinkers and people who smoke or use other tobacco products are at higher risk. Though it is most common in people over age 50, new research indicates that younger people may be developing oral cancers related to human papillomavirus (HPV).

Early detection can save

The good news? The earlier oral cancer is detected and treated, the better the survival rate – which is just one of the many reasons you should visit your dentist regularly. Twice-yearly dental checkups are typically covered with no or a low deductible under most Delta Dental plans.

As part of the exam, your dentist will check for oral cancer indicators, including feeling for lumps or irregular tissue in your mouth, head and neck. A biopsy will be recommended if anything seems concerning or out of the ordinary.

If it isn't treated this cancer can cause pain, the loss of salivary function, and the need for tissue removal, which can cause disfigurement. But Delta Dental says that if patients get checked often for early signs by their dentists, then oral cancer can be stopped in its tracks.

So what's the issue? Not enough seniors actually have dental care that would help them discover and stop cancer:

Infographic: U.S. Seniors Lack Dental Care

A new study published in the December edition of Health Affairs analyzed access to dental care for Medicare beneficiaries, and the findings don't look good. Only about 10% of older U.S. adults have dental insurance, and, of those who do, they still pay half of all their dental costs out of pocket.

The researchers looked at Medicare data to see how seniors with different income levels and types of insurance access dental care. They attributed the overall lack of coverage and high percentage of out-of-pocket spending to larger policy trends, including the exclusion of dental care in Medicare and the changing of insurance benefits for retirees.

"Despite the wealth of evidence that oral health is related to physical health, Medicare explicitly excludes dental care from coverage, leaving beneficiaries at risk for tooth decay and periodontal disease and exposed to high out-of-pocket spending,"

"Until dental care is appropriately considered to be part of one's medical care, and financially covered as such, poor oral health will continue to be the 'silent epidemic' that impedes improving the quality of life for older adults."

Clearly there needs to be a change in the general attitude concerning the need for care. Everyone can do their part to make dental care more viable for seniors.

If seniors cannot afford a plan, they need to do everything in their power to still get adequate care, such as looking at payment plans, seeking out low-cost care at dental schools, applying for government aid, maintaining good oral care at home, and so on. If you are senior, you should make oral cancer check-ups a natural part of your to-do list. You can find more information about oral cancer screenings at lagunavistadental.com/services/preventive-dentistry/oral-cancer/

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Why is Preventive Dental Care So Important for Seniors? was originally seen on: Laguna Vista Dental Office Website



Laguna Vista Dental
7915 Laguna Blvd, Ste 150
Elk Grove, CA 95758
(916) 684-3105
lagunavistadental@gmail.com

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