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3d开机号近10期

3d开机号近10期Friday, 26 Jun 20 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and a half and primarily focuses on GNU/Linux ? Subscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

TypeTitleAuthorRepliesLast Postsort icon
StoryAndroidLeftoversRianne Schestowitz26/06/2020 - 6:57pm
StoryTiny solder-down module and eval kit run Linux on an STM32MP1Rianne Schestowitz26/06/2020 - 6:50pm
StoryRed Hat/Fedora: Tips for Fedora 32 and MoreRoy Schestowitz26/06/2020 - 3:35pm
StoryAndroidLeftoversRianne Schestowitz26/06/2020 - 3:34pm
Story5 Best Ebook Readers for LinuxRoy Schestowitz26/06/2020 - 3:31pm
StoryMaintenance release: Godot 3.2.2Roy Schestowitz26/06/2020 - 3:25pm
StoryAMD Ryzen 5 4500U Performance On Windows 10 vs. Six Linux DistributionsRianne Schestowitz26/06/2020 - 3:21pm
StoryLinux Mint 20 “Ulyana” Is Now Available for Download, Here’s What’s NewRoy Schestowitz326/06/2020 - 3:11pm
StoryKDE/Plasma 5.19.2 for DebianRianne Schestowitz26/06/2020 - 3:06pm
StorySecurity LeftoversRoy Schestowitz26/06/2020 - 2:22pm

Tiny solder-down module and eval kit run Linux on an STM32MP1

Filed under
Linux

Ka-Ro’s 27 x 27mm, soldered-down “QSMP” module runs Linux on a Cortex-A7 based STM32MP1 with up to 512MB DDR3L, 4GB eMMC, and an optional dev kit. A recent i.MX8M Mini and Nano based QS8M with the same QFN form factor ships with an RPi-style devkit.

German embedded vendor Ka-Ro Electronics has launched a QFN-style, solder-down module with industrial temperature support that is available from Direct Insights in the UK and Mouser in the US starting at $30. The 27 x 27 x 3mm QSMP Series module runs Linux on a single-or dual-core, Cortex-A7 ST32M1 clocked at 650MHz with a 209MHz Cortex-M4 CPU. Other tiny ST32M1 modules include Kontron’s 25.4 x 25.4mm SOM-STM32MP157 and Octavo’s 18 x 18mm OSD32MP15x SiP module.

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Red Hat/Fedora: Tips for Fedora 32 and More

Filed under
Red Hat
  • Fedora 32 essential post-install tweaks

    I've written a guide showing essential post-install tweaks and configuration changes for Fedora 32 Workstation, intended to provide a complete, friendly and aesthetically pleasing desktop experience, including Gnome Tweaks, extensions, window buttons, desktop panel, new fonts, themes and icons, extra software repositories, extra applications, and more.

  • Securely access open source trusted AI packages in IBM Cloud Pak for Data

    As open source artificial intelligence technologies grow, the need for AI systems to make decisions fairly, to be invulnerable to tampering, and to be explainable is more important than ever. At IBM, we believe that building trust in AI starts in the open, with code that is transparent and accessible to anyone. To support our commitment to trusted AI, IBM previously released 3 open source trusted AI packages: AI Fairness 360, AI Explainability 360, and the Adversarial Robustness Toolbox.

    Developers need to incorporate trust in data and models as well as in the way packages are used inside their projects, so they don’t end up using packages with vulnerabilities or legal implications. In the latest IBM Cloud Pak for Data release, we added a feature to give developers secure access to our trusted AI packages via IBM Cloud Pak for Data’s Open Source Management service.

    Let’s take a closer look at the trusted AI packages and how to access them in IBM Cloud Pak for Data.

  • Red Hat and Affirmed Networks collaborate to help accelerate 5G deployments on Red Hat OpenShift

    Service providers are transforming and virtualizing their networks in response to an increasingly dynamic market and rapid technology changes. As new opportunities for services grow, 5G has also given service providers the opportunity to increase efficiency, flexibility and elastic scale with microservices-based cloud-native architectures.

    As these shifts take place, Red Hat and Affirmed are working together to help service providers adopt cloud-native network functions (CNFs) for 5G Cores. Building on the foundation of Red Hat OpenShift, we’re enabling the Affirmed UnityCloud "Any G" solution to be deployed more broadly on a supported, cloud-native backbone, making it easier for telecommunications companies to more efficiently deploy 5G, 4G and 3G services backed by a common telco cloud infrastructure.

5 Best Ebook Readers for Linux

Filed under
GNU
Linux
Software

Digital books provide a convenient way to carry a large library of books in your smartphones, computers, and cloud storage. The book reading experience on these devices depends on the reader’s software. This article will list various ebook management and reading apps for Linux. Some of these apps go beyond being simple readers and allow you to manage your entire digital book collection and convert them in different formats.

Read more

Maintenance release: Godot 3.2.2

Filed under
Development
Gaming

Godot contributors released the Godot 3.2 stable branch in January 2020 as a major update to our free and open source game engine. The main development effort then moved towards our future major version, Godot 4.0 (see Godot's Devblog for a preview of some things to come). But Godot 4.0 is still a long way off, and in the meantime we want to provide the best support possible to all Godot users, so the 3.2 branch is worked on in parallel and receives minor updates to fix bugs, improve usability and occasionally add some compatible features.

We thus released Godot 3.2.1 in March 2020 with a focus on fixing the main issues surfaced in Godot 3.2.

After fixing the most urgent issues in 3.2.1, we could take the time to add some new features to the 3.2 branch which we believe are important improvements to the Godot 3.2 experience (especially since we expect at least one year of development before 4.0 is released). Some of those features had already been partially implemented before the 3.2 release, but not merged to avoid delaying the release (any new feature involves new issues and a certain amount of time to improve and stabilize its implementation).

This brings us to Godot 3.2.2 released today, which includes a number of big new features that have been merged and tested over the past few months, on top of the usual batch of bug fixes, usability enhancements, documentation and translation updates.

Download Godot 3.2.2 now and read on about the changes in this update.

Read more

Also: Godot Engine 3.2.2 is out with 2D batching for the GLES2 renderer

AMD Ryzen 5 4500U Performance On Windows 10 vs. Six Linux Distributions

Filed under
Graphics/Benchmarks

As part of our Ryzen 5 4500U and Ryzen 7 4700U Linux benchmarking there have been multiple requests for showing how various Linux distributions run and perform with these exciting Ryzen 4000 series mobile CPUs. Here are some benchmarks not only looking at six Linux distributions but also the performance of Microsoft Windows 10 as was preloaded on the Lenovo Flex 5 15-inch 2-in-1.

The Lenovo Flex 5 15-inch 2-in-1 laptop that I picked up for $599 USD was used for this round of testing. This laptop features the Ryzen 5 4500U 6-core CPU with Vega graphics, 16GB of dual channel memory, 256GB SSD, and 14-inch 1080p display. It's quite a nice budget laptop with very great performance for the price. The operating systems tested for this comparison included...

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KDE/Plasma 5.19.2 for Debian

Filed under
KDE
Debian

I have been preparing this release for quite some time, but due to Qt 5.12 I could only test it in a virtual machine using Debian/experimental. But now, finally, a full upgrade to Plasma 5.19(.2) has arrived.

Unfortunately, it turned out that the OBS build servers are either overloaded, incapable, or broken, but they do not properly build the necessary packages. Thus, I make the Plasma 5.19.2 (and framework) packages available via my server, for amd64. Please use the following apt line...

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Security Leftovers

Filed under
Security
  • Security updates for Friday

    Security updates have been issued by Debian (alpine), Fedora (fwupd, microcode_ctl, mingw-libjpeg-turbo, mingw-sane-backends, suricata, and thunderbird), openSUSE (uftpd), Red Hat (nghttp2), SUSE (ceph, curl, mutt, squid, tigervnc, and unbound), and Ubuntu (linux kernel and nvidia-graphics-drivers-390, nvidia-graphics-drivers-440).

  • Nvidia squashes display driver code execution, information leak bugs

    This week, the tech giant published a security advisory for a total of six bugs in the driver, varying in severity with CVSS scores of between 5.5 and 7.8 and impacting both Windows and Linux machines.

  • Fancy hacking a PlayStation? Sony announces its bug bounty program

    You’ve probably heard the French saying, “Plus ?a change, plus c’est la même chose.”

    Alliteratively coined by the French satirical writer Jean-Baptiste Alphonse Karr, it means that the more things change, the more they remain the same, and it’s a cynical observation that what seems like an improvement may not, in the end, sort out the underlying problems or attitudes it was mean to fix.

    Well, here’s a change that really does seem to be a change, in heart as well as in direction!

    Sony, maker of the PlayStation games console series, has not always been friendly to hackers.

    About ten years ago, the company famously took legal action against a young George Hotz, better known as geohot, an American hacker – in the neutral sense of the word here – who has found his way into numerous “locked down” devices over the years.

Python: Bucket Sort, Regular Expressions in Python, and 5 Python Features That You May Not Be Familiar With

Filed under
Development
  • The Real Python Podcast – Episode #15: Python Regular Expressions, Views vs Copies in Pandas, and More

    Have you wanted to learn Regular Expressions in Python, but don’t know where to start? Have you stumbled into the dreaded pink SettingWithCopyWarning in Pandas? This week on the show, we have David Amos from the Real Python team to discuss a recent two-part series on Regex in Python. We also talk about another recent article on the site about views vs copies in Pandas. David also brings a few other articles and projects from the wider Python community for us to discuss.

  • Bucket Sort in Python

    In this tutorial, we'll be diving into the theory and implementation of Bucket Sort in Python.

    Bucket Sort is a comparison-type algorithm which assigns elements of a list we want to sort in Buckets, or Bins. The contents of these buckets are then sorted, typically with another algorithm. After sorting, the contents of the buckets are appended, forming a sorted collection.

    Bucket Sort can be thought of as a scatter-order-gather approach towards sorting a list, due to the fact that the elements are first scattered in buckets, ordered within them, and finally gathered into a new, sorted list.

    We'll implement Bucket Sort in Python and analyze it's time complexity.

  • 5 Python Features That You May Not Be Familiar With

    Python, for all its ease of learning, has some pockets of real complexity. If you’ve ever read through the programming language’s documentation, you’ve probably gotten a sense of that. If you’re new to the language, here are some features you might not be familiar with, but could nonetheless prove useful (or at least fun to experiment with).

    [...]

    Staying on top of the changes in a language like Python is never easy, but it can be fun finding out new things! Careful reading of the What’s new in Python 3.xx webpages is a good start; they are already there for both 3.9 and 3.10.

Games: Mists of Noyah, Planetary Annihilation: TITANS and Vampire: The Masquerade - Shadows of New York

Filed under
Gaming
  • After a rough launch, Mists of Noyah seems to be turning things around

    Mists of Noyah is a new co-op survival game from developer Pyxeralia, it's definitely pretty looking with some wonderful lighting and art but they had a very rough launch.

    When it released with Linux support on May 27, they ended up quickly getting only a 23% positive user score giving them a considerably negative outlook. However, Pyxeralia are showing how to come back in style and within a week they were able to get it back into Mostly Positive overall. A negative initial reaction can completely kill an indie game so they've been lucky to manage to push back.

    A thorough mixture of gameplay elements from an action-platformer with RPG elements to a crafting survival game with co-op, it's got a lot going for it. That's boosted up by the graphical style, which cleverly mixes together the pixel-art style with seriously vibrant colouring.

  • You can now be a majestic Unicorn commander in Planetary Annihilation: TITANS

    Planetary Annihilation: TITANS is real-time strategy game about war on a massive interplanetary scale and you can pick different commander units to control like the new majestic Unicorn.

    This is not a joke, this is serious game business we're talking about here. I will admit to taking off and cleaning my glasses, to ensure I was reading this correctly. Along with an update that brings improvements to various areas, Planetary Annihilation Inc did actually add in a Unicorn commander which is free to play as during the Steam Summer Sale and after you can buy it from the in-game Armoury.

  • Vampire: The Masquerade - Shadows of New York set to release in Q3 2020

    Vampire: The Masquerade - Shadows of New York, a standalone visual novel following from Coteries of New York is now set to release in Q3 2020.

    Now that we actually have a release window, we can expect it somewhere between July and September so it could end up being quite soon. If you love a good novel then Shadows of New York sounds promising, hopefully the end is not as abrupt as Coteries. The developer, Draw Distance, said that Coteries was basically an introduction with Shadows planned to be a more personal and unique tale.

Another Intel 4K + GNOME Optimization Yields 5% Faster Render Times, 10% Lower Power Use

Filed under
GNOME
Ubuntu

Daniel van Vugt of Canonical who has been responsible for many GNOME performance optimizations in recent years has another tantalizing improvement under review.

Recently the Canonical developer has been working on improving the Intel graphics experience on GNOME particularly at 4K after he upgraded his display and was unimpressed by the current level of performance for this default Ubuntu desktop environment.

Read more

today's leftovers

Filed under
Misc
  • Wine (so Proton eventually) takes another step towards Easy Anti-Cheat working

    Recently we highlighted the ongoing unofficial work to get Easy Anti-Cheat working in Wine (so Steam Play Proton then too) and it appears another major step has been achieved.

    We still don't know what the plan is, if any now, for Easy Anti-Cheat to officially support Wine / Proton and there's been no update from them directly or Epic Games on if it's going to happen. At least, not since they said they would work with Valve in Early 2019. With that in mind, this is very much a community-led effort from a CodeWeavers developer @Guy15241 with help from @0xdt0.

    The ongoing EAC work is now at a stage where they've been able to get Dead By Daylight into a game, although with low performance (Guy mentioned 1FPS in the menu). They also shared some shots...

  • ledger2beancount 2.3 released

    I released version 2.3 of ledger2beancount, a ledger to beancount converter.

    There are three notable changes with this release:

    1) Performance has significantly improved. One large, real-world test case has gone from around 160 seconds to 33 seconds. A smaller test case has gone from 11 seconds to ~3.5 seconds. 2) The documentation is available online now (via Read the Docs).

  • ASUS Chromebit CS10 Chrome OS PC Stick Sells for $69.99 (Promo)

    ASUS Chromebit CS10 was the cheapest Chrome OS hardware when it launched in 2015. Equipped with a Rockchip RK3288-C quad-core processor coupled with 2 GB RAM and 16 GB eMMC. plus one HDMI port and one USB port it was offered for $85.

    [...]

    The device has been in the wild long enough, that there are instructions to install other Linux distributions alongside Chrome OS including Arch Linux Arm and Ubuntu.

  • (Raspberry) Pi Commander | The MagPi 95
  • Puppet introduces beta of cloud-native, event-driven DevOps program: Relay

    Puppet is a great DevOps program for managing multiple servers, but it wants to do more than automating server setup, program installation, and system management. The Portland, Oregon-based open-source company wants to automate processes across any cloud infrastructure -- as well as all tools and APIs -- with its new cloud-aware DevOps program Relay.

  • How to use the Zoom malware safely on Linux if you absolutely have to

    “Zoom is malware.”

    You should be using Jitsi instead. (Or, if want to live stream to lots of people, pay for something like Vimeo Live if you can.)

  • IBM Offers Open Source Toolkit for COVID-19 Data Analysis

    The toolkit provides a set of Jupyter Notebooks to aggregate and clean up COVID-19 data from authoritative sources as a way to kickstart in-depth analysis.

  • The Open COVID Pledge – Don’t Say “I Do” Till You Think It Through

    We are still facing a global pandemic, yet we can take a measure of hope in the way COVID-19 has brought people and companies together to find solutions to this urgent crisis. One inspiring example of this collaborative effort is the Open COVID Pledge, created the Open COVID Coalition, which “calls on organizations around the world to make their patents and copyrights freely available in the fight against the COVID-19 pandemic.” The Coalition consists of an international group of scientists and lawyers, including notable IP scholars such as Profs. Mark Lemley and Jorge Contreras.

    [...]

    As reflected in the above examples, there is some flexibility in nature and scope of the license that may be used. For companies interested in using IP offered under the Pledge, it is important to note that such IP may be covered by a number of different licenses and that each license should be reviewed separately. As such, companies using pledged IP will need to have mechanisms in place to ensure compliance with all applicable licenses.

    [...]

    Companies that have made the Pledge are listed on the Open COVID Pledge website and include a number of well-known technology companies and research institutions. However, the Pledge has not yet seen wide adoption in certain key industries. For example, it does not appear that the Open COVID Pledge has been embraced by the pharmaceutical or medical device industries. In such situations, it is especially important for companies to carefully consider the impacts of being an early (or sole) adopter in an industry.

  • A new Amiga 1200 Case and Keys in 2020

    So, why would I want to do this to my Amiga 1200? Well, my old case is yellowing and so are the keys. The keys and I have never really liked that biscuit and gray look. When I saw the Amiga CDTV with its black keyboard and case, I thought how cool and sleek it looked but I wanted a more traditional computer (at that time) not something that was meant to go on your Hi-Fi stack. Now, today, you can have both the cool black look along with the full fledged Amiga Computer.

  • Daniel Stenberg: bug-bounty reward amounts in curl

    A while ago I tweeted the good news that we’ve handed over our largest single monetary reward yet in the curl bug-bounty program: 700 USD. We announced this security problem in association with the curl 7.71.0 release the other day.

    Someone responded to me and wanted this clarified: we award 700 USD to someone for reporting a curl bug that potentially affects users on virtually every computer system out there – while Apple just days earlier awarded a researcher 100,000 USD for an Apple-specific security flaw.

  • LKRG 0.8 Released For Increasing Linux Kernel Runtime Security

    Version 0.8 of the Linux Kernel Runtime Guard (LKRG) has been released for further enhancing the runtime security provided by this out-of-tree kernel code plus other general improvements.

    The Linux Kernel Runtime Guard provides runtime integrity checking of the kernel and various runtime detection of different security exploits. This out-of-tree kernel module saw a big update on Thursday in the form of v0.8.

Programming: Python, RcppSimdJson and PHP

Filed under
Development
  • Listener GUI Started

    So with the code-context, the dictation in Listener is getting okay-ish. It's still pretty frustrating and error prone, but I can use it maybe 1/4 of the time (mostly for doc-strings). Part of the frustration is just that the language models are not yet well tuned for some commonly needed phrases that the tokeniser didn't generate for the code corpus, but a big part of it is that I don't yet have the correction/undo operations nor the navigation bits, so any mistake means editing by keyboard. The lack of a good contextual awareness/biasing model is also pretty big.

    So, I've been working on getting the GUI built up for doing corrections. As of now, a dbus service runs in the background which is driving the interpreter, and IBus and delivering the partial and final transcriptions via signals to the front-end GUI. I've also got a "floating window" that shows the text as you speak, though currently you have to install some KWin config to get it to float over other windows (due to focus-stealing protections). I'm thinking a KDE plasmoid that runs in the panel might be a better approach.

  • A user story about user stories

    The way I learned to use the term “user story”, back in the late 1990s at the beginnings of what is now called “agile programming”, was to describe a kind of roleplaying exercise in which you imagine a person and the person’s use case as a way of getting an outside perspective on the design, the documentation, and especially the UI of something you’re writing.

    For example:

    Meet Joe. He works for Randomcorp, who has a nasty huge old Subversion repository they want him to convert to Git. Joe is a recent grad who got thrown at the problem because he’s new on the job and his manager figures this is a good performance test in a place where the damage will be easily contained if he screws up. Joe himself doesn’t know this, but his teammates have figured it out.

    Joe is smart and ambitious but has little experience with large projects yet. He knows there’s an open-source culture out there, but isn’t part of it – he’s thought about running Linux at home because the more senior geeks around him all seem to do that, but hasn’t found a good specific reason to jump yet. In truth most of what he does with his home machine is play games. He likes “Elite: Dangerous” and the Bioshock series.

    [...]

    Point three is that design by user story is not a technique for generating code, it’ s a technique for changing your mind. If you approach it in an overly narrow and instrumental way, you won’t imagine apparently irrelevant details like what kinds of video games Joe likes. But you should do that sort of thing; the brain hack works in exact proportion to how much imaginative life you give your characters.

    (Which in particular, is why “As an X, I want to do Y” is such a sadly reductive parody. This formula is designed to stereotype the process, but stereotyping is the enemy of novelty, and novelty is exactly what you want to generate.)

    A few of my readers might have the right kind of experience for this to sound familiar. The mental process is similar to what in theater and cinema is called “method acting.” The goal is also similar – to generate situational responses that are outside your normal habits.

    Once again: you have to get past tools and practices to discover that the important part of software design – the most difficult and worthwhile part – is mindset. In this case, and temporarily, someone else’s.

  • RcppSimdJson 0.0.6: New Upstream, New Features!

    A very exciting RcppSimdJson release with the updated upstream simdjson release 0.4.0 as well as a first set of new JSON parsing functions just hit CRAN. RcppSimdJson wraps the fantastic and genuinely impressive simdjson library by Daniel Lemire and collaborators. Via very clever algorithmic engineering to obtain largely branch-free code, coupled with modern C++ and newer compiler instructions, it results in parsing gigabytes of JSON parsed per second which is quite mindboggling. The best-case performance is ‘faster than CPU speed’ as use of parallel SIMD instructions and careful branch avoidance can lead to less than one cpu cycle use per byte parsed; see the video of the recent talk by Daniel Lemire at QCon (which was also voted best talk). The very recent 0.4.0 release further improves the already impressive speed.

  • PHP 8.0.0 Alpha 1 available for testing

    The PHP team is pleased to announce the first testing release of PHP 8.0.0, Alpha 1. This starts the PHP 8.0 release cycle, the rough outline of which is specified in the PHP Wiki.

  • PHP 8.0 Alpha 1 Released - Running Faster And With New Features

    PHP 8.0 Alpha 1 was just released as the first development snapshot for this major PHP programming language update due to ship around the end of November.

    Most notable with PHP 8.0 is the just-in-time (JIT) support and other performance improvements to accelerate the already increasingly speedy PHP7 compared to the sluggish PHP5 days. Earlier this month I ran some PHP 8.0 benchmarks including JIT too and in both modes PHP 8.0 is shaping up to be faster than prior PHP releases. I'll have some more numbers out soon.

  • PHP version 7.3.20RC1 and 7.4.8RC1

    RPM of PHP version 7.4.8RC1 are available as SCL in remi-test repository and as base packages in the remi-test repository for Fedora 32 or remi-php74-test repository for Fedora 30-31 and Enterprise Linux 7-8.

    RPM of PHP version 7.3.20RC1 are available as SCL in remi-test repository and as base packages in the remi-test repository for Fedora 30-31 or remi-php73-test repository for Enterprise Linux.

EGMDE Is Still Being Hacked On As A Lightweight Mir Desktop

Filed under
GNU
Graphics/Benchmarks
Linux

A year and a half later, it turns out this lightweight Mir desktop is still being worked on by lead Mir developer Alan Griffiths. Through his recent experiments with EGMDE on the latest Mir code-base, there is now improved keyboard shortcut handling, optional support for workspaces, optional support for shell components, and other changes.

Griffiths outlined the latest EGMDE process on Ubuntu Discourse for those interested. He did note, however, "egmde is still not ready for use as a lightweight desktop."

Read more

Direct: egmde: updated features

Also: Mike Blumenkrantz: Briefly Piglit

Mageia 8 Alpha 1 Released With Better ARM Support, Linux 5.7 Kernel

Filed under
MDV

Mageia 8 Alpha 1 is out this morning as the newest version of this Linux distribution that originates from the once legendary Mandrake Linux.

Mageia 8 has been working on better ARM support, they have nearly wrapped up their Python 2 removal effort, RPM package metadata is now compressed with Zstd rather than XZ for faster processing, the Linux 5.7 kernel is powering the distro, various packaging improvements, Mageia Control Center enhancements, and a newer KDE Plasma stack for the default desktop experience.

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Tumbleweed Gets LibreOffice "7", New Breezy Features

Filed under
LibO
SUSE

LibreOffice 7 beta 2 was updated in snapshot 20200622. The new major version improves the usage of quotation marks and an apostrophe in several languages with autocorrect. LibreOffice 7 adds support for exporting to new versions of Open Document Format, available via Tools > Options > Load/Save > General > ODF format version: “ODF 1.3” and “ODF 1.3 Extended”; the latter is the default, unless the user has previously changed the version in the configuration. Another new (experimental) feature is to make documents more accessible: an accessibility check tool to review common accessibility problems in documents, and support for PDF/UA specifications in the PDF export dialog. To enable the accessibility check tool and the PDF/UA export, go to: Tools > Options… > LibreOffice > Advanced > Optional Features > Enable experimental features (may be unstable). Then restart LibreOffice. A handful of libraries were updated in the snapshot including libzip 1.7.1, which restore LIBZIP_VERSION_{MAJOR,MINOR,MICRO} symbols, and gnome-desktop 3.36.3.1 had some clock and translation updates. The general-purpose scripting language php7 updated to version 7.4.7 fixed a regression in the previous version when yielding an array based generator and fixed a bug that involved hangs when an invalid value was encountered. The microcode updates for Intel x86/x86-64 CPUs, ucode-intel, reverted some code for the processor microarchitecture Skylake in the snapshot that caused some stability issues. The snapshot is trending moderately stable with a rating of 78, according to the Tumbleweed snapshot reviewer.

Read more

Also: User defined color for symbols in LibreOffice Math formulas

Audiocasts/Shows: LHS (Linux in the Ham Shack)and New Python Shows

Filed under
Development
GNU
Linux

today's howtos

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HowTos
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AndroidLeftovers

5 Best Ebook Readers for Linux

Digital books provide a convenient way to carry a large library of books in your smartphones, computers, and cloud storage. The book reading experience on these devices depends on the reader’s software. This article will list various ebook management and reading apps for Linux. Some of these apps go beyond being simple readers and allow you to manage your entire digital book collection and convert them in different formats.Read more

Maintenance release: Godot 3.2.2

Godot contributors released the Godot 3.2 stable branch in January 2020 as a major update to our free and open source game engine. The main development effort then moved towards our future major version, Godot 4.0 (see Godot's Devblog for a preview of some things to come). But Godot 4.0 is still a long way off, and in the meantime we want to provide the best support possible to all Godot users, so the 3.2 branch is worked on in parallel and receives minor updates to fix bugs, improve usability and occasionally add some compatible features.We thus released Godot 3.2.1 in March 2020 with a focus on fixing the main issues surfaced in Godot 3.2.After fixing the most urgent issues in 3.2.1, we could take the time to add some new features to the 3.2 branch which we believe are important improvements to the Godot 3.2 experience (especially since we expect at least one year of development before 4.0 is released). Some of those features had already been partially implemented before the 3.2 release, but not merged to avoid delaying the release (any new feature involves new issues and a certain amount of time to improve and stabilize its implementation).This brings us to Godot 3.2.2 released today, which includes a number of big new features that have been merged and tested over the past few months, on top of the usual batch of bug fixes, usability enhancements, documentation and translation updates.Download Godot 3.2.2 now and read on about the changes in this update.Read moreAlso: Godot Engine 3.2.2 is out with 2D batching for the GLES2 renderer

AMD Ryzen 5 4500U Performance On Windows 10 vs. Six Linux Distributions

As part of our Ryzen 5 4500U and Ryzen 7 4700U Linux benchmarking there have been multiple requests for showing how various Linux distributions run and perform with these exciting Ryzen 4000 series mobile CPUs. Here are some benchmarks not only looking at six Linux distributions but also the performance of Microsoft Windows 10 as was preloaded on the Lenovo Flex 5 15-inch 2-in-1.The Lenovo Flex 5 15-inch 2-in-1 laptop that I picked up for $599 USD was used for this round of testing. This laptop features the Ryzen 5 4500U 6-core CPU with Vega graphics, 16GB of dual channel memory, 256GB SSD, and 14-inch 1080p display. It's quite a nice budget laptop with very great performance for the price. The operating systems tested for this comparison included...Read more